• by Jesse Eisinger / ProPublica
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After Hurricane Irma hit three months ago in Orlando, Florida, the local police got a desperate 911 call from a 12-year-old boy reporting that his mother and siblings were unconscious. Fumes overcame the first deputy who rushed to the scene. After the police arrived at the property, they found Jan Lebron Diaz, age 13, Jan’s older sister Kiara, 16, and their mother Desiree, 34, lying dead, poisoned from carbon monoxide emitted by their portable generator. Four others in the house went to the hospital. If 12-year-old Louis hadn’t made that call, they might have died, too.

  • by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR
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On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving’s “village” — the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother — gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye and send her home. The afternoon light was gray but bright, flooding through tall arched windows and pouring past white columns, illuminating the flag that covered her casket. Sprays of callas and roses dotted the room like giant corsages, flanking photos from happier times: Shalon in a slinky maternity dress, sprawled across her couch with her puppy; Shalon, sleepy-eyed and cradling the tiny head of her newborn daughter, Soleil. In one portrait Shalon wore a vibrant smile and the crisp uniform of the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, where she had been a lieutenant commander. Many of the mourners were similarly attired. Shalon’s father, Samuel, surveyed the rows of somber faces from the lectern. “I’ve never been in a room with so many doctors,” he marveled. “… I’ve never seen so many Ph.D.s.”

  • By: Anna Renault
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Each month has special designations. Some are more well-known than others. While there are also many highlights to which we should perhaps pay special attention. Throughout December we may see more ads, read more articles or hear lots of information about both Colitis and Crohn’s disease. Both of these issues are conditions that impact our colon. Sadly, no one likes to talk about our colon or bowels, or things like diarrhea. However, these are serious conditions that can make life very uncomfortable. These are issues that need to be discussed with your primary care physician and perhaps with a specialist if they are ongoing and need special treatment. Both are treatable!